Posts Tagged "employee"

Employee Expense Rules Have Changed

Posted on Aug 1, 2018

One of the things that’s going away under the new tax reform laws implemented this year is an employee’s ability to deduct unreimbursed expenses related to their job. Farewell to miscellaneous itemized deductions The deduction for unreimbursed employee expenses was among the qualified 2-percent miscellaneous itemized deductions that were eliminated by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) passed in late 2017. This could be a blow for employees who had relied on it to deduct unreimbursed expenses for such things as work-related meals, entertainment, gifts, lodging, tools, supplies, professional dues, licensing fees, work clothes and work-related education. A win-win solution If you are an employee who has used this tax deduction, here are some tips to minimize its loss: Determine the impact. Review your past tax records to help estimate how much you expect to pay in unreimbursed work expenses and what the tax deduction was worth to you. Discuss the situation with your employer. If the loss of this deduction is a hardship, talk to your employer about how you will be affected. The win-win. Ask your employer to consider reimbursing you for your work-related expenses directly. Your employer can probably deduct those expenses from their business return without increasing your taxable income. This will save them tax dollars when compared with the cost of raising your pay in order to indirectly compensate you for your unreimbursed expenses. If you are an employer, consider talking to your employees about their unreimbursed expenses now that the tax laws have changed. If you wish to reimburse their qualified business expenses, make sure your reporting adheres to IRS accountable plan rules so that your reimbursements are deductible as a business expense and do not add to your employees’ incomes. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

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Getting summer help? Classify properly

Posted on Jun 25, 2018

Don’t subject your business to tax penalties by misclassifying employees and independent contractors. You can avoid misclassification by understanding how the law defines employment (we can help you with this), and by creating and following work-habit guidelines. Thoroughly review your work arrangement not only at the beginning of professional relationships, but regularly to ensure both you and your employee are on the same page. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

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A new credit for small business owners

Posted on Jun 6, 2018

Starting this year, employers can take advantage of a new credit for paid family and medical leave created by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. Employers may claim the credit based on wages paid to employees while they are on leave for the birth of a child, a serious health condition, and other family and medical events. The credit is a percentage (ranging between 12.5 percent to 25 percent) of the amount of wages paid to an employee while on family and medical leave for up to 12 weeks. The credit is set to expire after the 2019 tax year, however, so keep this in mind for long-term planning. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

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Do you have a household employee? Don’t ignore the nanny tax

Posted on Jan 29, 2018

As you review your filing requirements for 2018, make sure you don’t overlook the nanny tax related to household employees. If you have a housekeeper or any other household employee, you could be liable to pay state and federal payroll taxes. How to know if you must pay the nanny tax First, you’ll need to determine whether you have a household employee. Generally, this is someone you hire to work in or around your house. It could be a babysitter, nurse, gardener, etc. It doesn’t matter whether they work part-time or full-time, or whether you pay them hourly, weekly, or by the job. But not everyone who works around your house is an employee. For example, if a lawn service sends someone to cut your grass each week, that person is not your employee. As a general rule, workers who bring their own tools, do work for multiple customers and/or control when and how they do the work are not your household employees. Your responsibilities If you have a household employee, you’ll generally be responsible for 2017 payroll taxes if you paid that individual more than $2,000 last year. However, federal unemployment tax kicks in if you pay more than $1,000 to all domestic employees in any quarter. It’s not always easy to tell whether you have a household employee, or whether exceptions apply. If in doubt, don’t hesitate to call our office. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

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CONTRACTOR OR EMPLOYEE?

Posted on Sep 20, 2017

Knowing the difference is important Is a worker an independent contractor or an employee? This seemingly simple question is often the contentious subject of numerous IRS audits. As an employer, getting this wrong could cost you plenty in the way of Social Security, Medicare and other employment-related taxes. Here is what you need to know. As the worker: If you are a contractor and not considered an employee you must: Pay self-employment taxes (Social Security and Medicare-related taxes) Make estimated federal and state tax payments. Handle your own benefits, insurance and bookkeeping. As the employer: You must ensure your employee versus independent contractor determination is correct. Getting this wrong in the eyes of the IRS can lead to: Payment and penalties related to Social Security and Medicare taxes. Payment of possible overtime, including penalties for a contractor reclassified as an employee. A legal obligation to pay for benefits. Things to consider When the IRS recharacterizes an independent contractor as an employee they look at the business relationship between the employer and the worker. The IRS focuses on the degree of control exercised by the business over the work done and they assess the worker’s independence. Here are some of their guidelines: The more the employer has the right to control the work (when, how and where the work is done), the more likely the worker is an employee. The more the financial relationship is controlled by the employer, the more likely the relationship will be seen as an employee and not an independent contractor. To clarify this, an independent contractor should have a contract, have multiple customers, invoice the company for work done, and handle financial matters in a professional manner. The more businesslike the arrangement, the more likely you have an independent contractor relationship. While there are no hard-set rules, the more reasonable your basis for classification and the more consistently it is applied, the more likely an independent contractor classification will not be challenged. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

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