Posts Tagged "insurance"

How to handle a gap in health care coverage

Posted on May 9, 2018

Health care coverage gaps happen. Whether because of job loss or an extended sabbatical between gigs, you may find yourself without health care for a period. Here are some tax consequences you should know about, as well as tips to fix a coverage gap. Coverage gap tax issues You will have to pay a penalty in 2018 if you don’t have health care coverage for three consecutive months or more. Last year the annual penalty was equal to 2.5 percent of your household income, or $695 per adult (and $347.50 per child), whichever was higher. The 2018 amounts will be slightly higher to adjust for inflation. Example: Susan lost her job-based health insurance on Dec. 31, 2016, and applied for a plan through her state’s insurance marketplace program on Feb. 15, 2017, which went into effect on April 1, 2017. Because she was without coverage for three months, she owes a fourth of the penalty on her 2017 tax return (three of 12 months uncovered, or 1/4 of the year). While the penalty is still in place for tax years 2018 and earlier, it is eliminated starting in the 2019 tax year by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. Three ways to handle a gap There are three main ways to handle a gap in health care coverage: COBRA. If you’re in a coverage gap because you’ve left a job, you may be able to keep your previous employer’s health care coverage for up to 18 months through the federal COBRA program. One downside to this is that you’ll have to pay the full premium yourself (it’s typically split between you and your employer while you are employed), plus a potential administrative fee. Marketplace. You can enroll in an insurance marketplace health care plan through Healthcare.gov or your state’s portal. Typically you can only sign up for or change a Marketplace plan once a year, but you can qualify for a 60-day special enrollment period after you’ve had a major life event, such as losing a job, moving to a new home or getting married. Applying for an exemption. If you are without health care coverage for an extended period, you may still avoid paying the penalty by qualifying for an exemption. Valid exemptions include unaffordability (you must prove the cheapest health insurance plan costs more than 8.16 percent of your household income), income below the tax filing threshold (which was $10,400 for single filers below age 65 in 2017), ability to demonstrate certain financial hardships, or membership in certain tribal groups or religious associations. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

Read More

3 reasons why your child should (or shouldn’t) have life insurance

Posted on Apr 27, 2018

When determining whether or not to carry life insurance on your children, you’ll find that people have a variety of opinions. Here’s a look at some of the most common considerations for and against life insurance policies on children: Financial security. Traditionally, you take out life insurance to provide for the financial security of dependents. The policy should include funds to replace the insured’s income and to pay off debts. Neither of these reasons applies to young children. They don’t generally have any significant income, and they don’t usually have any debts. Some parents might want to carry a modest amount of insurance to cover funeral costs for their children in case the unthinkable happens. Insurability. Some people believe that by taking out a policy at a young age, it helps guarantee insurability as the child grows older. This could be important if the child develops a major illness later in life. The problem is that if the child does develop a serious illness, insurance will still become very expensive or limited. Insurance as an investment. Some advisors suggest that parents should take out a whole life policy on their children. These policies include a savings component to build up cash value in the policy. You could then use that value for education expenses or other needs. But others say that there are cheaper and more efficient ways to save than by using life insurance. For example, putting money into a tax-advantaged 529 education savings plan is often a better way to save for school tuition costs. Although a majority of advisors may argue against life insurance for children, there may be some situations where people find it makes sense. However, you shouldn’t take out a policy just because it is offered to you or because others are doing it. Make sure to do your homework and know exactly why you need the insurance. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

Read More

New 1095-B and 1095-C due date: March 2

Posted on Feb 19, 2018

The IRS said it will allow large health insurance companies to delay sending out health insurance confirmation forms. The Jan. 31 due date has been delayed until March 2. Keep in mind that you can still fill your tax return without this form as long as you can prove you have health insurance. This change does not impact people who purchase insurance from the ACA marketplace (Form 1095-A). Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

Read More

Does your business need cyber insurance?

Posted on Jan 31, 2018

It’s a nightmare scenario few small businesses consider: hackers breach your computer system, steal your customer lists and threaten to exploit sensitive data. Data breaches by malicious individuals don’t just pose a financial risk. They threaten your reputation and can trigger litigation if your customers blame you for the exposure of their data. So far, many of the victims of these high-profile attacks are large corporations. A poster child for this is the massive 2017 cyber breach of the credit reporting agency Equifax, which affected more than 143 million Americans. Equifax’s financial loss was estimated at $125 million, equal to more than a quarter of their net income during 2016. Equifax also reportedly faces more than 50 class action lawsuits, which also may be covered by the company’s insurers. Here are some things to consider regarding the management of your cyber risk with potential insurance coverage: • Do you have coverage? Your insurance policy may already cover some of the risks of cyber attacks. A good place to start is to review your policy and understand what is covered, if anything. Also spend time evaluating your potential risk to determine how it correlates to your insurance coverage. • Comprehensive or partial? Depending upon how you assess your risk, you may consider either comprehensive cyber insurance or partial coverage in the form of a rider or endorsement on an existing policy. Talk to your current insurance firm to determine your alternatives. Because cyber insurance is still a new service, your provider’s options may be limited. The cyber insurance market is currently dominated by four major insurers that offer comprehensive insurance, according to Business Insurance magazine: American International Group, Beazley, Chubb and Zurich Insurance Group. Partial coverage may include riders covering errors and omissions, and the cost of business interruption caused by cyber attacks. • Unique elements of a cyber insurance policy. Most comprehensive cyber insurance policies cover breach-response and forensic costs. This covers the cost of finding the cause of a data breach, fixing it and limiting the damage. Comprehensive policies should provide liability coverage in case you are sued by customers as a result of their data being exposed during the attack. • Know the exclusions. Some cyber insurance policies do not cover breaches caused by infrastructure failure, or attacks by state-sanctioned hackers, according to ThinkAdvisor. There have been many high-profile cyber attacks allegedly attributed to hackers affiliated with the Russian and Chinese governments in recent years, so know how your policy covers this situation. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

Read More

IS YOUR HSA A RETIREMENT TOOL? THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

Posted on Aug 2, 2017

Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) are a great way to pay for medical expenses, and since unused funds roll over from year to year, the account can also provide a source of retirement funds in addition to other plans like 401(k)s or IRAs. But be aware that HSAs have significant disadvantages when compared to other retirement investment tools. The Good HSAs work best when they are used to pay for qualified medical expenses. Neither your original contributions to an HSA nor your investment earnings are taxed when used this way. There is no required distribution after you reach age 70½, like there is with 401(k)s and IRAs. The Bad You can only contribute to an HSA if you have a high deductible health insurance plan. This means you will pay more out of pocket each year when you need to use health services. Annual contributions to HSAs are limited to $3,400 a year for individuals and $6,750 a year for families (add $1,000 for people aged 55 or older). HSAs typically have fewer investment options compared with other investment tools including 401(k)s and IRAs. They also often have high management and administrative fees. The Ugly Before you reach age 65, non-medical withdrawals from HSAs come with a whopping 20 percent penalty, plus they are taxed as income. Even after age 65, both contributions and earnings are taxed when they are withdrawn for non-medical expenses. In this way, HSAs compare unfavorably with 401(k)s and IRAs, which end their early withdrawal period earlier, at age 59½. They also have lower early withdrawal penalties of just 10 percent. HSAs are a powerful tool to help manage the ever-rising costs of health care. Knowing the rules and the costs associated with them can help you position an HSA with your other retirement options. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

Read More