Posts Tagged "business"

Tax checklist for business startups

Posted on Mar 21, 2018

Starting your own business can be equal parts thrilling and intimidating. Complying with regulations and tax requirements definitely falls into the latter category. But, with some professional help, it doesn’t have to be that way. You can get started with this checklist of things you’ll need to consider. Are you a hobby or a business? This may seem basic to some people, but the first thing you’ll have to consider when starting out is whether you really are operating a business, or pursuing a hobby. A hobby can look like a business, but essentially it’s something you do for its own sake that may or may not turn a profit. A true business is generally run for the purpose of making money and has a reasonable expectation of turning a profit. The benefit of operating as a business is that you have more tax tools available to you, such as being able to deduct your losses. Pick your business structure. If you operate as a business, you’ll have to choose whether it will be taxed as a sole proprietorship, partnership, S corporation or C corporation. All entities except C corporations “pass through” their business income onto your personal tax return. The decision gets more complicated if you legally organize your business as a limited liability corporation (LLC). In this case you will need to choose your tax status as either a partnership or an S corporation. Each tax structure has its benefits and downsides – it’s best to discuss what is best for you. Apply for tax identification numbers. In most cases, your business will have to apply for an employer identification number (EIN) from both the federal and state governments. Select an accounting method. You’ll have to choose whether to use an accrual or cash accounting method. Generally speaking, the accrual method means your business revenue and expenses are recorded when they are billed. In the cash method, revenue and expenses are instead recorded when you are paid. There are federal rules regarding which option you may use. You will also have to choose whether to operate on a calendar year or fiscal year. Create a plan to track financials. Operating a business successfully requires continuous monitoring of your financial condition. This includes forecasting your financials and tracking actual performance against your projections. Too many businesses fail in the first couple of years because they fail to understand the importance of cash flow for startup operations. Don’t let this be you. Prepare for your tax requirements. Business owners generally will have to make quarterly estimated tax payments to the IRS. If you have employees, you’ll have to pay your share of their Social Security and Medicare taxes. You also have the obligation to withhold your employees’ share of taxes, Social Security and Medicare from their wages. Your personal income tax return can also get more complicated if you operate as one of the “pass-through” business structures. This is just a short list of some of the things you should be ready to discuss as you start your business. Knowing your way around these rules can make the difference between success and failure, but don’t be intimidated. Help is available so don’t hesitate to call if you have any questions. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

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New tax legislation requires planning

Posted on Mar 14, 2018

Though many taxpayers appreciate the income tax cuts in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) passed late last year, others are skeptical that it will simplify their tax planning. With every simplification, there are many more tax issues that still require planning to realize extra tax benefits. Here are seven of them: Planning for all the moving parts In many ways, the TCJA gives with one hand and takes away with the other. The “giving hand” provides a lower income tax rate structure and a higher standard deduction, while the “taking hand” gets rid of personal exemptions, suspends many itemized deductions and limits deductions that remain. There are many variables that determine whether you come out ahead or behind and a tax planning session can help you figure it all out. Getting creative and flexible about itemizing Many itemized deductions remain the same, others were eliminated completely and some have new limits. For example, while charitable contributions are still a qualified deduction, there is now a $10,000 combined cap on state, local and property tax deductions. The new constraints mean considering creative solutions to maximize these deductions. One idea is to make better use of the donation of appreciated stock as part of your charitable giving. Dealing with new complexity in small business ownership Small business owners and sole proprietors will have to do a complicated calculation to see how much of the 20 percent reduction to pass-through qualified business income they can take. It depends on your profession and your expenditures on capital and wages. This calculation can get complicated very quickly. Understanding the newly changed “marriage penalty” The disadvantage for married couples within the tax code is still very much in place, but it is changing. For instance, the marriage penalty that had given unfavorable income tax rates to married joint filers when compared to single individuals goes away in the TCJA for most income levels. But it rears its head again in the $10,000 combined state, local and property tax limitation, which does not double for married joint filers. This is something you’ll have to plan around. Getting credit for your kids There are many new tax benefits for parents in the TCJA. The child tax credit doubles to $2,000 and the phaseout threshold jumps to $400,000 from $110,000 previously for joint filers, making it available to more taxpayers. Dependents ineligible for the child tax credit can qualify for a new $500 per-person family tax credit. On top of that, distributions from 529 education savings plans can now be used to pay private school tuition for K-12 students. Adjusting to disappearing tax breaks If your tax planning was built on any of the following expiring tax provisions, you’ll have to change your plan: personal exemptions; miscellaneous itemized deductions; home equity interest; alimony deductions (expiring in 2019); the additional child tax credit; theft and casualty losses; and the domestic production activity deduction (DPAD) Facing the old complexities Many areas of the tax code remain largely the same and contain both potential pitfalls and opportunities to find tax savings. Managing capital gains and tax-loss harvesting, charitable activity deductions and a tax-advantaged retirement strategy are just a few areas where you can unlock extra value with smart planning. The big changes to tax reform this year may be disconcerting at first, but in change there is opportunity. After the dust settles on the 2017 tax season, get ready to take a detailed look at what 2018 tax reform means for you. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

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Does your business need cyber insurance?

Posted on Jan 31, 2018

It’s a nightmare scenario few small businesses consider: hackers breach your computer system, steal your customer lists and threaten to exploit sensitive data. Data breaches by malicious individuals don’t just pose a financial risk. They threaten your reputation and can trigger litigation if your customers blame you for the exposure of their data. So far, many of the victims of these high-profile attacks are large corporations. A poster child for this is the massive 2017 cyber breach of the credit reporting agency Equifax, which affected more than 143 million Americans. Equifax’s financial loss was estimated at $125 million, equal to more than a quarter of their net income during 2016. Equifax also reportedly faces more than 50 class action lawsuits, which also may be covered by the company’s insurers. Here are some things to consider regarding the management of your cyber risk with potential insurance coverage: • Do you have coverage? Your insurance policy may already cover some of the risks of cyber attacks. A good place to start is to review your policy and understand what is covered, if anything. Also spend time evaluating your potential risk to determine how it correlates to your insurance coverage. • Comprehensive or partial? Depending upon how you assess your risk, you may consider either comprehensive cyber insurance or partial coverage in the form of a rider or endorsement on an existing policy. Talk to your current insurance firm to determine your alternatives. Because cyber insurance is still a new service, your provider’s options may be limited. The cyber insurance market is currently dominated by four major insurers that offer comprehensive insurance, according to Business Insurance magazine: American International Group, Beazley, Chubb and Zurich Insurance Group. Partial coverage may include riders covering errors and omissions, and the cost of business interruption caused by cyber attacks. • Unique elements of a cyber insurance policy. Most comprehensive cyber insurance policies cover breach-response and forensic costs. This covers the cost of finding the cause of a data breach, fixing it and limiting the damage. Comprehensive policies should provide liability coverage in case you are sued by customers as a result of their data being exposed during the attack. • Know the exclusions. Some cyber insurance policies do not cover breaches caused by infrastructure failure, or attacks by state-sanctioned hackers, according to ThinkAdvisor. There have been many high-profile cyber attacks allegedly attributed to hackers affiliated with the Russian and Chinese governments in recent years, so know how your policy covers this situation. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

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Business owners: Forms due Jan. 31

Posted on Jan 19, 2018

Don’t forget that Jan. 31 is an important due date if you own a business, or have a side business in addition to your regular job. Avoid fines by making sure Forms W-2 and 1099-MISC are postmarked or sent electronically by this date to the IRS as well to the people you did business with in 2017. Remember, you may face separate fines for each late form. The Jan. 31 deadline for these forms was unified as part of the IRS’s larger effort to minimize refund fraud. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

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Credit card transactions pose audit risks for business owners

Posted on Dec 27, 2017

Small business owners beware: the IRS may scrutinize reporting of credit card transactions more closely after it was criticized for lax enforcement. The IRS’ overseer, the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA), recently said the IRS had been missing opportunities to audit tax returns that had large discrepancies between income and the card payments reported on Forms 1099-K. This means small businesses that accept credit, debit or gift card payments can expect to draw the attention of IRS auditors if there are material differences between what is reported on their tax returns and what is on their 1099-Ks. Tax gap concern driving the scrutiny TIGTA has estimated an underpayment of more than $450 billion in income taxes every year. In an effort to close this “tax gap,” it recommended the IRS focus on some of the larger or more obvious sources of underpayment. One area TIGTA identified was on Forms 1099-K, where more than 20,000 taxpayers who received them had discrepancies of more than $10,000 on their returns. Calculating from these minimum numbers, there was at least a $200 million underpayment. Who is impacted If you have a business that accepts payment cards like debit cards or credit cards, you will probably receive a Form 1099-K from your payment processor. The form is also required for anyone who has $20,000 in card payments and 200 transactions or more per year. Examples of those who would receive Forms 1099-K include users of PayPal, sellers on Etsy, cab drivers and any small business that accepts card transactions as a form of payment. Here’s how you can prepare Receiving a Form 1099-K and reporting it in such a way that the IRS is satisfied can be complicated. You could easily double-report your revenue from 1099-Ks out of an excess of caution. Or, you may not be disclosing your correct reporting of payment card income in a way that IRS audit programs are able to identify. It’s often best to get professional guidance to ensure your return does not stick out when the IRS tries to comply with the TIGTA request for more oversight. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

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