Posts Tagged "business"

Small business tax management

Posted on Nov 20, 2017

Taxes can cause serious headaches for business owners. Help yourself keep track of federal, state and local taxes by creating a calendar that includes every tax-related deadline that applies to your specific business. Then write out procedures for submitting reports, calculating taxes and making payments. Doing this will help you build a solid process you can count on, rather than relying on memory. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

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Business disaster recovery plan essentials

Posted on Nov 15, 2017

Irish writer Oscar Wilde advised us to “expect the unexpected.” He would have made a good disaster planner. Small businesses are the most impacted because they do not usually have a formal disaster recovery plan. As a result, 40 to 60 percent of small businesses close permanently after a disaster, according to Liberty Mutual Insurance. Don’t be a part of that statistic. Now is a great time to review your business’ disaster recovery plan, or to make one if you don’t have one. By focusing on some of the most critical elements of a disaster plan, you can avoid being overwhelmed by the challenge. Set your roster The first step in your disaster plan should be to determine what skill sets you will need in a disaster, and who should be part of the team. The size of your team will vary, but could include IT, HR and operations personnel. Determine who your backups are and what outside resources and personnel you can use. Assess your risk You need to understand your risks before you address them. Consider your physical locations and determine the hazards unique to your region – floods, hurricanes, tornados, earthquakes, etc. Focus on the events most likely to occur, but also save some time to consider outside possibilities. Create your plan Determine and rank the most critical functions and processes for your business. Next, determine how these could be affected by the risks you’ve identified. You should end up with two lists: your most important business factors, and those most at risk. Now you are ready to create a recovery plan that focuses on critical business functions and applies them to the various types of possible business interruption. Your plan should: Consider offsite backups and vendors to help assist with implementing a data storage backup plan. Assess where you store the critical information upon which each of your business functions rely. Establish alternative or remote work arrangements for employees, including their physical, logistical and data needs. Create an annual review of your insurance policies. Evaluate the worth of business interruption coverage within your property and casualty insurance. You may wish to offset some of the potential loss of both business income and recovery expenses within these policies. Consider any opportunities for tax relief from losses sustained as a result of a disaster. Have a plan to keep detailed records and build the appropriate supplier team to help determine the best approach for your business. Make sure you plan for a variety of losses. This can be loss of electricity, a fatal crash of your business systems or material damage to inventory and production capacity. Communicate Document your plan so it is clear, accessible and easy to implement. Share it with everyone on your disaster roster so they know who is responsible for what and how they should act. Review and test your plan at least annually with your roster, and distribute any changes to keep everyone informed. With luck, you will never need to use your business disaster recovery plan. Although we can never prevent disasters, we can do our best to reduce the impact they have on business operations. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

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BUSINESS TAX: TIME TO CONSIDER SECTION 179?

Posted on Oct 25, 2017

Section 179 expensing can be a very powerful tax-planning tool for small- and medium-sized businesses acquiring capital assets. While it doesn’t change the amount of depreciation you can take over the life of capital purchase, it can change the timing by allowing you to deduct your purchase in the first year you place it in service. How does Section 179 work? Generally, when you purchase a piece of equipment for your business — say a $10,000 computer system — you can’t deduct the entire cost in the year it was purchased. It must take the expense by depreciating the cost over several years. Section 179 allows you to deduct the cost of the $10,000 computer in the year it was purchased and placed in service. You can deduct the expense of up to $510,000 of qualified property. The $510,000 deduction begins phasing out dollar for dollar if $2.03 million or more of qualified property is purchased during the year (meaning it phases out completely after you’ve purchased $2.54 million in business capital assets). What is qualified property? Qualified property includes things like tangible personal property, computer software and qualified real property (e.g., interior building costs for nonresidential buildings). Section 179 doesn’t apply to property acquired for use in a rental property if it’s not your trade or business but simply an investment. Some vehicles qualify for Section 179 expensing, within limits. (The limits were brought about when some business owners bought expensive Hummers and expensed the cost in a single year.) If you are considering your options for depreciating your business assets under Section 179, here are important details to remember: Section 179 allows deducting the expense of up to $510,000 of qualified business purchases. A Section 179 deduction cannot create a loss for the business. A Section 179 deduction must be for business use. If an asset is not entirely used for business, the allowance is reduced. If you sell a Section 179 asset prior to the full depreciation period, you will have to record any sales proceeds as taxable income. Many states limit the use of this federal shifting of depreciation. Taking Section 179 for capital purchases can be useful, but it’s not for everyone. Using Section 179 for an immediate tax break means it’ll no longer be available for future years. Consider this as you manage your business’s tax obligation. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

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Is your hobby actually a business?

Posted on Sep 22, 2017

If you invest a ton of personal time and effort into your hobby, plus you have multiple customers and keep professional records, your hobby might actually be a business. Turning your hobby into a business means you can deduct qualified business expenses. But that’s only if you do it right. The IRS has certain criteria that must be met, or your hobby-turned-business could be challenged. Give us a call to find out more. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

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CONTRACTOR OR EMPLOYEE?

Posted on Sep 20, 2017

Knowing the difference is important Is a worker an independent contractor or an employee? This seemingly simple question is often the contentious subject of numerous IRS audits. As an employer, getting this wrong could cost you plenty in the way of Social Security, Medicare and other employment-related taxes. Here is what you need to know. As the worker: If you are a contractor and not considered an employee you must: Pay self-employment taxes (Social Security and Medicare-related taxes) Make estimated federal and state tax payments. Handle your own benefits, insurance and bookkeeping. As the employer: You must ensure your employee versus independent contractor determination is correct. Getting this wrong in the eyes of the IRS can lead to: Payment and penalties related to Social Security and Medicare taxes. Payment of possible overtime, including penalties for a contractor reclassified as an employee. A legal obligation to pay for benefits. Things to consider When the IRS recharacterizes an independent contractor as an employee they look at the business relationship between the employer and the worker. The IRS focuses on the degree of control exercised by the business over the work done and they assess the worker’s independence. Here are some of their guidelines: The more the employer has the right to control the work (when, how and where the work is done), the more likely the worker is an employee. The more the financial relationship is controlled by the employer, the more likely the relationship will be seen as an employee and not an independent contractor. To clarify this, an independent contractor should have a contract, have multiple customers, invoice the company for work done, and handle financial matters in a professional manner. The more businesslike the arrangement, the more likely you have an independent contractor relationship. While there are no hard-set rules, the more reasonable your basis for classification and the more consistently it is applied, the more likely an independent contractor classification will not be challenged. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

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