Posts Tagged "wages"

2018 Social Security changes announced

Posted on Nov 13, 2017

The Social Security Administration stated there will be a 2 percent cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) to monthly Social Security and Supplemental Security Income benefits for 2018. This is the largest increase since 2012. Up to $128,700 in wages will be subject to Social Security taxes (up $1,500 from 2017). Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

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Check your children’s filing requirements

Posted on Jan 22, 2014

Your children may need to file a 2013 income tax return. A return is needed if wages exceeded $6,100, the child had self-employment income over $400, or investment income exceeded $1,000. If the child had both wages and investment income, other thresholds apply. Contact us for more information or filing assistance. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in the McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates specializes known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws, we help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+ <https://plus.google.com/108764776146415485651/posts> , LinkedIn <http://www.linkedin.com/in/gillilandcpa> , Facebook <https://www.facebook.com/gillilandcpa> , and Twitter...

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Identify types of income to end up with lower 2013 taxes

Posted on Jul 25, 2013

Act now to identify ways to minimize your 2013 taxes. Start by estimating your 2013 income, sorting it into categories such as wages, investments, passive income, retirement plan distributions, and active business income. Different tax rules apply to different kinds of income, and rules differ at various income thresholds. If you act now rather than later in the year, you’ll have time to identify and put tax-saving options to work for you.   Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in the McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates specializes known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws, we help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+ , LinkedIn , Facebook, and Twitter....

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Follow the tax rules when you borrow from your corporation

Posted on Jun 27, 2013

If you’re a business owner and your company lends you money, you’ll enter it in the books as a shareholder loan. However, if your return is audited, the IRS will scrutinize the loan to see whether it is really disguised wages or a dividend, taxable to you as income. Knowing what the IRS might look at may be useful when you structure the arrangement. * First, the IRS will look at your relationship to the company. If you’re the sole shareholder with full control over earnings, that may weaken your case that the loan is genuine. On the other hand, if you’re one of several shareholders and none of the others received similar payments, that suggests it might be a genuine loan. * Next, the IRS will look at the details of the loan. Did you sign a formal promissory note? Did you pledge any security against the loan? Does the loan have a specific maturity date, or is there a repayment schedule? What rate of interest are you paying? Have you missed any payments, and if so, has the company tried to collect them? The more businesslike the terms of the loan, the more it will appear to be a genuine debt. * Finally, the IRS will consider other factors. Is your company paying you a salary that’s in line with the work you perform? Has the company paid dividends, or is this the only payment to its shareholder? Is the size of the loan within your ability to repay? How does the size of the loan compare to the company’s profits? Whether the IRS will try to tax you on the “loan” will depend on all these factors. If you’ve paid attention to the details, the loan should withstand IRS scrutiny. Contact us if you’d like more information about borrowing money from your closely held corporation....

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New Medicare taxes take effect in 2013

Posted on Feb 26, 2013

The 2010 health care reform legislation included several provisions that go into effect this year. Among them is the increase in Medicare taxes for taxpayers with incomes above certain levels. Here is an overview of these two new taxes. FIRST, the payroll Medicare tax will increase from 1.45% of wages to 2.35% on amounts above $200,000 earned by individuals and above $250,000 earned by married couples filing joint returns. The tax increase will also apply to self-employment income exceeding the threshold amounts. Employers are required to withhold the additional tax from wages exceeding $200,000, regardless of the individual’s filing status. They are not required to inform the employee when they begin the additional withholding, nor are they required to match the additional withholding. SECOND, there is a new 3.8% Medicare tax on unearned income for single taxpayers with adjusted gross income over $200,000 and married couples with income over $250,000. The tax will apply to the lesser of (a) net investment income, or (b) the amount by which modified adjusted gross income exceeds the $200,000 / $250,000 thresholds. The tax may require adjustments to the estimated taxes paid by an individual, but it does not have to be withheld from wages. Examples of unearned income include interest, dividends, capital gains, royalties, and rental income. Social security benefits, alimony, tax-exempt interest, and distributions from most retirement plans are examples of unearned income not subject to this new...

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