Posts Tagged "tax breaks"

4 Business Year-End Tax Moves

Posted on Dec 12, 2017

Even though the end of 2017 is near, it is not too late to get your business into the best possible tax position for the new year. Here are some year-end tax moves to consider: Update the office. A fresh coat of paint and new office furnishings not only make your place of business more comfortable, they also provide another tax deduction. How you handle deducting these expenses will vary depending upon whether you own or lease your office space, so reach out for assistance if you have questions. Reward your staff. If you have sufficient cash flow, giving your staff a yearend bonus is a great way to let them know you appreciate them. It’s also tax deductible. Update your skills. Attend a workshop or conference to improve your professional skills. While there are some limitations, many travel, lodging and out-of-pocket expenses related to professional training are tax-deductible. Be nimble. Recent discussions in Congress could mean a dramatic change in taxes on business profits beginning in 2018. Stay abreast of these developments in case you need to make last-minute moves to shift profits from one year to the next to reduce your tax rate. There are a lot of nuances in the tax code affecting each of these end-of-year moves. Don’t hesitate to get in touch if you need...

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Year-end tax checklist

Posted on Nov 5, 2017

As the year draws to a close, there are several tax-saving ideas you should consider.Use this checklist to make sure you don’t miss an opportunity before the year is out. Retirement distributions and contributions. Make final contributions to your qualified retirement plan, and take any required minimum distributions from yourretirement accounts. The penalty for not taking minimum distributions can be high. Investment management. Rebalance your investment portfolio, and take any final investment gains and losses. Capital losses can be used to net against your capital gains. You can also take up to $3,000 of capital losses in excess of capital gains each year and use it to lower your ordinary income. Last-minute charitable giving. Make a late-year charitable donation. Even better, make the donation with appreciated stock you’ve owned more than a year. You can often can make a larger donation – and get a larger deduction – without paying capital gains taxes. Noncash contribution opportunity.Gather up noncash items for donation,document the items and give those in good condition to your favorite charity. Make sure you get a receipt from the charity, and take a photo of the items donated just in case. Gifts to dependents and others.You may provide gifts to an individual tax-free of up to $14,000 per year in total. Remember that all gifts given (birthdays, holidays, etc.) count toward the total. Organize records now.Start collecting and organizing your end-of-year tax records. Estimate your tax liability and make any required estimated tax...

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Business tax: time to consider Section 179?

Posted on Oct 25, 2017

Section 179 expensing can be a very powerful tax-planning tool for small- and medium-sized businesses acquiring capital assets. While it doesn’t change the amount of depreciation you can take over the life of a capital purchase, it can change the timing by allowing you to deduct your purchase in the first year you place it in service. Review these details if you’re considering depreciating your business assets under Section 179: Section 179 allows deducting the expense of up to $510,000 of qualified business purchases. A Section 179 deduction cannot create a loss for the business. A Section 179 deduction must be for business use. If an asset is not entirely used for business, the allowance is reduced. If you sell a Section 179 asset prior to the full depreciation period, you will have to record any sales proceeds as taxable income. Many states limit the use of this federal shifting of depreciation. Taking Section 179 for capital purchases can be useful, but it’s not for everyone. Using it for an immediate tax break means it’ll no longer be available for future...

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Contractor or Employee? Knowing the difference is important

Posted on Sep 28, 2017

Is a worker an independent contractor or an employee? As an employer, getting this wrong could land you with an IRS audit and cost you plenty in many other ways.Here’s what you should know: As the worker: If the worker is a contractor and not considered an employee, he/she must: Pay self-employment taxes (Social Security and Medicare-related taxes). Make estimated federal and state tax payments. Handle his/her own benefits, insurance and bookkeeping. As the employer: You must ensure your employee versus independent contractor determination is correct. Getting this wrong in the eyes of the IRS can lead to: Payment and penalties related to Social Security and Medicare taxes. Payment of possible overtime, including penalties for a contractor reclassified as an employee. A legal obligation to pay for benefits. When the IRS recharacterizes an independent contractor as an employee, they look at the business relationship between the employer and the worker. The IRS considers if the employer has the right to control the work (when, how and where the work is done) and the financial relationship (i.e., a contractor has a contract and customers, and invoices the company). The more reasonable your basis for classification and the more consistently it is applied, the more likely an independent contractor classification will not be...

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Avoid These Common Tax Mistakes

Posted on Sep 24, 2017

There are nearly 1,000 different tax forms used by the IRS to report tax obligations. It’s no wonder the IRS faces thousands of tax returns with errors each year. Here are some of the most common: Wrong names and Social Security numbers. Taxpayers regularly make mistakes by entering incorrect information for their spouses and dependents. If you recently married or divorced but haven’t yet changed your name with the Social Security Administration, you’ll need to file under your old name. Errors in age and birthdate. Much of the tax code is based on age. Without the correct birthdate, your eligibility for tax benefits could be cast in doubt. Incorrect bank account numbers. If you’re expecting a refund and want to have it direct deposited into your account, double-check your routing and account numbers. The IRS may catch most errors, but many are often missed. Once your refund is deposited in the wrong bank account, it’s very difficult to get it fixed. Overlooking online donations. Many people forget about emailed receipts at tax time. Catch missing deductions by searching your email inbox for keywords such as “gift” or “donation” before you file. Missing forms. Taxpayers can miss dividend, interest and brokerage forms (Form 1099s) they get from their banks and investment accounts. These potential missing forms now also include Form 1095, proof of health insurance. If a form is missing, it may cost you extra tax, penalties and interest. Not signing the return. Don’t forget to sign your return! The IRS won’t accept an unsigned return, and many people forget this last step. An unsigned tax return is the same thing as not filing in the eyes of the IRS. You not only face penalties and fines, but your tax return is open for audit...

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