Posts Tagged "underpayment"

No change to fourth-quarter interest rates

Posted on Oct 10, 2017

Fourth-quarter interest rates will stay the same. Those rates include: 4 percent for overpayments (3 percent for corporations), 1.5 percent for the portion of a corporate overpayment over $10,000, 4 percent for underpayments and 6 percent for large corporation underpayments. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

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Have you checked your withholding lately?

Posted on May 14, 2014

Did you receive a large tax refund or owe a large balance due on your 2013 income tax filing? If so, it may be time for you to check your withholding. Changing your withholding is as simple as filing a new Form W-4 with your employer. The smart taxpayer will calculate withholding to be as close to the actual amount 2014 tax liability will end up being. That will prevent you from being penalized for underpayment and from giving the IRS interest-free use of your money for a year. Keep these general rules in mind. You won’t face an underpayment penalty if you pay for 2014, through withholding or quarterly estimated payments, at least 100% of your 2013 tax liability (110% if your adjusted gross income for 2013 is over $150,000), or if you pay at least 90% of what you’ll owe for 2014. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in the McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates specializes known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws, we help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+ <https://plus.google.com/108764776146415485651/posts> , LinkedIn <http://www.linkedin.com/in/gillilandcpa> , Facebook <https://www.facebook.com/gillilandcpa> , and Twitter...

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File by October 17 to avoid penalties

Posted on Oct 25, 2011

Tick-tock. Time is almost up on that six-month extension you filed back in April to give yourself more time to complete your 2010 individual income tax return.  What happens if you fail to file your return by the extended due date? One consequence: Unless a disaster-relief exception applies or you have a valid reason, you may be charged penalties and interest.  For example, the penalty for filing your return after October 17, 2011, is 5% of the amount of your unpaid tax, per month, up to a maximum of 25%. After 60 days, a minimum penalty of the smaller of $135 or 100% of the tax due applies.  In addition, a late payment penalty of ½ of 1% of the tax due may apply for each month or part of a month that you fail to pay the tax due until you reach the full 25%. The two penalties interact and can be combined.  You’ll also have to pay interest on the tax due. During 2011, the rate on underpayment of tax was 3% in the first quarter, 4% in the second and third quarters, and back to 3% in the fourth quarter. The interest is compounded daily and can be charged on penalties.  Since the penalty and interest are based on unpaid tax, neither applies when your return shows zero tax due. Filing a return is still a good idea, however. Why? The general rule limiting the IRS to a three-year period for assessing tax begins when you file. No return means no triggering of the statute of limitations. Give us a call if you think you may miss a deadline. We can help keep penalties to a...

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