Posts Tagged "deductions"

6 must-dos when you donate to charity

Posted on Nov 15, 2017

Donations are a great way to give to a deserving charity, and they also give back in the form of a tax deduction. Unfortunately, charitable donations are under scrutiny by the IRS, and many donations without adequate documentation are being rejected. Here are six things you need to do to ensure your charitable donation will be tax-deductible: 1. Make sure your charity is eligible. Only donations to qualified charitable organizations registered with the IRS are tax-deductible. You can confirm an organization qualifies by calling the IRS at (877) 829-5500 or visiting the IRS website. 2. Itemize. You must itemize your deductions using Schedule A in order to take a deduction for a contribution. If you’re going to itemize your return to take advantage of charitable deductions, it also makes sense to look for other itemized deductions. These include state and local taxes, real estate taxes, home mortgage interest and eligible medical expenses over a certain threshold. 3. Get receipts. Get receipts for your deductible contributions. Receipts are not filed with your tax return but must be kept with your tax records. You must get the receipt at the time of the donation or the IRS may not allow the deduction. 4. Pay attention to the calendar. Contributions are deductible in the year they are made. To be deductible in 2017, contributions must be made by Dec. 31, although there is an exception. Contributions made by credit card are deductible even if you don’t pay off the charge until the following year, as long as the contribution is reported on your credit card statement by Dec. 31. Similarly, contribution checks written before Dec. 31 are deductible in the year written, even if the check is not cashed until the following year. 5. Take extra steps for noncash donations. You can make a contribution of clothing or items around the home you no longer use. If you decide to make one of these noncash contributions, it is up to you to determine the value of the contribution. However, many charities provide a donation value guide to help you determine the value of your contribution. Your donated items must be in good or better condition and you should receive a receipt from the charitable organization for your donations. If your noncash contributions are greater than $500, you must file a Form 8283 to provide additional information to the IRS about your contribution. For noncash donations greater than $5,000, you must also get an independent appraisal to certify the worth of the items. 6. Keep track of mileage. If you drive for charitable purposes, this mileage can be deductible as well. For example, miles driven to deliver meals to the elderly, to be a volunteer coach or to transport others to and from a charitable event, can be deducted at 14 cents per mile. A log of the mileage must be maintained to substantiate your charitable driving. Remember, charitable giving can be a valuable tax deduction – but only if you take the right...

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Year-end tax checklist

Posted on Nov 5, 2017

As the year draws to a close, there are several tax-saving ideas you should consider.Use this checklist to make sure you don’t miss an opportunity before the year is out. Retirement distributions and contributions. Make final contributions to your qualified retirement plan, and take any required minimum distributions from yourretirement accounts. The penalty for not taking minimum distributions can be high. Investment management. Rebalance your investment portfolio, and take any final investment gains and losses. Capital losses can be used to net against your capital gains. You can also take up to $3,000 of capital losses in excess of capital gains each year and use it to lower your ordinary income. Last-minute charitable giving. Make a late-year charitable donation. Even better, make the donation with appreciated stock you’ve owned more than a year. You can often can make a larger donation – and get a larger deduction – without paying capital gains taxes. Noncash contribution opportunity.Gather up noncash items for donation,document the items and give those in good condition to your favorite charity. Make sure you get a receipt from the charity, and take a photo of the items donated just in case. Gifts to dependents and others.You may provide gifts to an individual tax-free of up to $14,000 per year in total. Remember that all gifts given (birthdays, holidays, etc.) count toward the total. Organize records now.Start collecting and organizing your end-of-year tax records. Estimate your tax liability and make any required estimated tax...

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How to hit the standard deduction threshold

Posted on Oct 24, 2017

Have you hit your standard deduction threshold yet? If not, you still have a few options to help create a lower tax bill for the 2017 tax season. One way is to donate stock you’ve held for more than a year to a charity. You can also consider prepaying next year’s donation in the current year. Another option is to pay your taxes prior to year-end. We can help you find the best option for your situation. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

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Tax Filing Reminders

Posted on Oct 16, 2017

Filing deadline for 2016 tax returns for individuals or corporations if you requested/received a six -month extension. Pay taxes due by this date. Deadline to recharacterize a Roth IRA to a Traditional IRA. Deadline to fund your Keogh or SEP plans if you requested a filing...

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Fair market value (FMV): What is it and how to defend it

Posted on Oct 6, 2017

So what is fair market value (FMV)? According to the IRS, it’s the price that property would sell for on the open market. This is the price that would be agreed on between a willing buyer and a willing seller. Neither would be required to act, and both would have reasonable knowledge of the relevant facts. This is the standard the IRS uses to determine if an item sold or donated by you is valued correctly for income tax purposes. It is also a definition that is so broad that it is wide open to interpretation. Understand when FMV is used Fair market value is used whenever an item is bought, sold or donated and has tax consequences. The most common examples are: Buying or selling your home, other real estate, personal property or business property Establishing values of other business assets like inventory Valuing charitable donations of personal goods and property like automobiles Valuing bartering of services, business ownership transfers or assets in an estate of a deceased taxpayer Know how to defend your FMV determination If the IRS decides your FMV opinion is wrong, you are not only subject to more tax, but also penalties. Here are a few tips to help defend your FMV in case of an audit. Properly document donations. Fair market value of non-cash charitable donations is an area that can easily be challenged by the IRS. Ensure your donated items are in good or better condition. Properly document the items donated and keep copies of published valuations from charities like the Salvation Army. Don’t forget to ask for a receipt confirming your donations. Get an appraisal. If you sell a major asset such as a small business, collections, art or capital asset, make sure you get an independent appraisal of the property first. While still open to interpretation by the IRS, this appraisal can be a solid basis for defending any differences between your valuation and the IRS. Keep pricing proof for similar items and transactions. This is especially important if you barter goods and services. If you have a copy of an advertisement for a similar item to the one you sold, it can readily support your FMV claim. Take photos and keep detailed records. The condition of an item is often a key consideration in establishing FMV. It is fair to assume an item has wear and tear when you sell or donate it. Visual documentation can be used to support your claimed amount. And keeping copies of invoices for major purchases is also a good idea. With proper planning, establishing FMV of an item can be done in a reasonably defendable way if ever challenged. Gilliland & Associates, PC is a full-service CPA firm specializing in tax planning for individuals and businesses in the Northern Virginia area. We are based in Falls Church, VA and also service clients in McLean and Tysons Corner, VA. Gilliland & Associates is known for our superior knowledge and aggressive interpretation and application of tax laws. We help you keep more of your earnings by finding you the lowest possible tax on your business or personal tax return. You can connect with us on Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and...

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